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Safety & Dogs

Porth Ysgo, Penllyn

Safety

A coastal walk should always be a safe and enjoyable experience. It is worth considering the following points particularly if you are new to walking, likely to be subjected to poor or changeable weather or you intend to explore the longer and more remote sections of the Path.

  • Stay on the path and away from cliff edges.
  • Wear boots and warm, waterproof clothing.
  • Take extra care in windy and/or wet conditions.
  • Always supervise children and dogs.
  • Leave gates and property as you find them.
  • Remember that mobile signal can be patchy in some coastal destinations so let someone know where you are heading and when you are due to arrive.
  • Protect plants and animals, and take your litter home.

Dogs

The Wales Coast Path can be a fantastic place to explore with your dog but please be aware that in some stretches you may be exposed to cliff top walking, wildlife and livestock. It is the dog owner’s responsibility to ensure that their dog is not a danger or nuisance to farm animals, wildlife or other people.

Please be aware that, while dogs are widely welcomed on the Wales Coast Path, you may find some stretches where dog bans are in place (this includes some beaches in the summer season). Please be aware of dog ban notices; a fine will be imposed if you are found to be in breach of a dog ban.

Follow the Countryside Code:

  • By law, you must control your dog so that it does not disturb or scare farm animals or wildlife. You must keep your dog on a short lead on most areas of open country and common land between 1 March and 31 July, and at all times near farm animals.
  • You do not have to put your dog on a lead on public paths as long as it is under close control. But as a general rule, keep your dog on a lead if you cannot rely on its obedience. By law, farmers are entitled to destroy a dog that injures or worries their animals.
  • If a farm animal chases you and your dog, it is safer to let your dog off the lead – don’t risk getting hurt by trying to protect it.
  • Take particular care that your dog doesn’t scare sheep and lambs or wander where it might disturb birds that nest on the ground and other wildlife – eggs and young will soon die without protection from their parents.
  • Everyone knows how unpleasant dog mess is and it can cause infections – so always clean up after your dog and get rid of the mess responsibly. Also make sure your dog is wormed regularly to protect it, other animals and people.
  • At certain times dogs may not be allowed on some areas of open land or may need to be kept on a lead. Please follow any signs. 

Please also be aware that as dogs are curious animals and often love to run and explore, it is advised that dogs are kept under particularly close control when cliff top walking.

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